GroupGroup of students and three professors working with Prof. Joe Pesek and Dr. Maria Matyska-Pesek at Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil.

 Prof. Joseph Pesek received a grant from the Brazilian government agency (CNPg) associated with Ministry of Science and Technology and Dr. Maria Matyska-Pesek received a grant from Brazilian government agency (CAPES) linked to Ministry of Education.  Grants are devoted to development of new separation methods for analysis of different food products, impurities in food, main components and monitoring the changes in food after food processing.  Both researchers completed their first visit to Brazil.  The two weeks at the Federal University in Pelotas was productive.  Collaboration was established and after the visit the main collaborator (Prof. Fabio Chavez) wrote:

” I received nice feedback from the students about how nice and helpful you both were.  We are looking forward to your next visit.  Enjoy your chimarrao. That’s the gaucho word for the mate drink. Fábio C. Chaves, Professor Adjunto”.  Many useful ideas and projects were discussed and would be worked on by Pesek’s research group at San Jose State University. 

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Center for Green Chemistry, Monash University AUSTRALIA
Center for Green Chemistry Monash University - Australia
Joe with Prof. Milton Hearn: Center for Green Chemistry Monash University – Australia

The projects with Professor Hearn encompass several areas of investigation related to the analysis of peptides.  This first utilizes etched chemically modified capillaries as the separation medium.  These studies have uncovered new methods for the analysis of peptides as well as understanding the fundamental behavior of various peptides in electrophoretic systems.  Most recently the use of mass spectroscopy detection has been undertaken for the analysis of tryptic digests in proteomic determinations.  A number of HPLC studies are also underway.  These include the analysis of hydrophilic peptides and metabolites using hydride-based stationary phases.  The development of such analytical protocols is useful in clinical diagnoses, pharmaceutical studies and the monitoring of food products.  

 MicroSolv Tech Corp. Eatontown, NEW JERSEY, USA

Bill and Suzanne from MicroSolv Tech. Corp.

Bill and Suzanne from MicroSolv Tech. Corp.

 Microsolv Technology Corporation of Eatontown, NJ is the distributor and marketer of two types of separation materials that were created in our labs:  silica hydride-based separation materials and etched chemically modified capillaries for electrophoretic separations.  There products have been commercially available since 2003.  The silica hydride-based stationary phases possess many unique separation capabilities including the property of aqueous normal phase behavior.  This feature allows for the analysis of highly polar compounds such as metabolites that can be used in drug development, clinical analyses, food product monitoring and forensic methods.  The stationary phases are referred to as Type-C silica and the capillaries and marketed under the name celerity.  A more complete description of the company and the products can be found at http//www.mtc-usa.com.  

             Steven Fischer, Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA

 Steve

Joe and Steve in Warsaw, Poland.

This collaboration focuses on the development of silica hydride stationary phases for use in the analysis of metabolites.  The Metabolomics group at Agilent has collaborated on the combination of HPLC with mass spectrometry in this rapidly developing research area.  The method utilized is aqueous normal phase chromatography that is particularly adapted for the analysis of polar compounds.  Since many important metabolites are polar, these materials have provided unique approaches for their determination in physiological samples.  Many labs around the world are now discovering fundamental information about drugs and disease markers as well as plant metabolism with this technique.  

Professor Boguslaw Buszewski (in the middle), Nicolar Copernicus University, Torun, Poland

Bogus

Brent Dawson (Postdoc in Pesek’s lab, at that time), Boguslaw and Joe in Torun, Poland.

The collaboration with Professor Buszewski’s group involves developing a better understanding of the fundamental properties of stationary phases.  There have been major focuses.  The first is of the silica hydride material in general.  The goal is to understand how the hydride surface creates a unique environment for solving separation problems.  The second major investigation involves the cholesterol stationary phase.  The cholesterol group on the silica surface retains some of its liquid crystal properties when bonded and it has been shown to provide interesting chromatographic selectivity based on molecular shape. 

Dr. Reinhard Boysen, Centre for Greene Chemistry, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Reinhrad

Erika, Joe, Maria and Reinhard – Eldridge Estate Red Hill: “Morning Tea” after grape picking. Sorrento – Australia 2008

Collaboration with Dr. Boysen has spanned a broad range of biological applications and methods.  The analysis of peptides by chromatography, capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography has been a major focus.  The interest in peptides involves both synthetic molecules and those derived from protein digest. More recently the collaboration has expanded to nucleotides and other metabolites.  The use of silica hydride related separation media are a central feature of all the research investigations. 

Dr. John Duly, Department of Pharmacy, University of Queensland and Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Australia

Jonh

Joe and John – Brisbane, Australia

Small polar metabolites can often provide unique information about disease processes and the efficacy of drugs.  A number of nucleotides have been identified as markers for certain serious medical conditions for infants.  One approach has been developed that allows for rapid identification and quantitation of two such compounds.  New methods are currently under investigation that will broaden the range of diseases that can be used in clinical laboratories for rapid and accurate diagnoses. 

Joe and Prof. Jinno from Toyohashi, Japan

Joe and Prof. Jinno from Toyohashi, Japan

The collaboration with Professor Jinno at the Toyohashi University of Technology in Japan involves the development of the cholesterol stationary phase for HPLC and its applications to practical analyses.  The material has been used to develop analyses for drugs such as steroids and environmental pollutants, particularly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.  In addition to standard HPLC, the material has been adapted for use in microcolumn HPLC and in capillary electrochromatography.
Joe with Prof. Lu; Dalian, CHINA

Joe with Prof. Lu; Dalian, CHINA

The collaboration with the Chromatography Center at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics began after its founder, Professor Lu, visited San Jose State in 1993.  Since that time regular exchanges and visits have taken place between the Institute and San Jose State University.  After Dr. Lu’s retirement, the collaboration continued under the direction of Professor Hanfa Zou in Dalian.  The focus of the research is to develop a better understanding of the chemical principles of separation for various HPLC stationary phases as well as materials used in capillary electrochromatography. 

Maria with Prof. Klaus Alber: University of Tubingen in Germany.
Maria with Prof. Klaus Albert: University of Tubingen in Germany.

The collaboration with Professor Albert from the University of Tubingen recently received funding from the National Science Foundation and the German government.  The project involves solid state NMR methods for the study of chromatographic materials.  NMR spectroscopy recorded in the suspended state has the potential to be an essential technique to elucidate information about structural and dynamic features of the stationary phase as well as interactions between the analyte and the stationary phase in a liquid environment. Several special NMR-techniques are being used in the suspended-state to determine and characterize interactions with the stationary phase.  The goal is to develop a direct correlation with chromatographic results.

VISITING SCHOLARS, POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS, TEACHERS AND STUDENTS

 1.  Dr. Jack Frost, 1972-74, Postdoctoral Fellow.

2.  Dr. Franklin Mason, 1979-80, Postdoctoral Fellow.

3.  Dr. Anil Gulati, 1987, Postdoctoral Fellow.

4.  Dr. Junior Sandoval, 1988-1997, Professor, University of Cali, Columbia.

5.  Elisabet Jonsson, Visiting Research Student, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, 1989-90.

6.  Professor Byong Lee, on sabbatical from Keon Kuk University, Republic of South Korea, 1989-90.

7.  Anna Alquist, Visiting Research Student, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, 1990-91.

8.  Dr. Akbar Raisi, on sabbatical from Tehran Medical Academy, Iran, 1990-91.

9.  Mirva Auvinen, Visiting Research Student, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, 1991.

10. Peter Visser, Visiting Research Student, van’t Hoff Institute, The Netherlands, 1991-93.

11. Dr. Eric Williamsen, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Fellow, 1991-4.

12. Anna Svensson, Visiting Research Student, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, 1992.

13. Cliff van Amen, Visiting Research Student, van’t Hoff Institute, the Netherlands, 1992-93.

14. Celine Lena, Visiting Research Student, University of Bordeaux, France, 1993

15. Sophie Pehrrson, Visiting Research Student, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, 1993.

16. Anestro Arrindell, Visiting Research Student, van’t Hoff Institute, the Netherlands, 1993.

17. Helena Hemphala, Visiting Research Student, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, 1994.

18. Dale Hopper, High School Teacher, San Jose, CA.

19. Bartek Slusarski, Visiting Research Student, Gdansk, Poland, 1995.

20. Dr. Arianne Gelain, Visiting Research Scholar, Milan, Italy, 1996.

21.  Goetz Schlotterback, Visiting Research Scholar, Tubingen, Germany, 1996.

22. Arndt Ellwanger, Visiting Research Student, Tubingen, Germany, 1997.

23. Jenny Ivarsson, Visiting Reserach Student, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, 1997.

24. Craig Seran, High School Teacher, Los Altos, CA, Partners-in-Science Program, 1997, 1998.

25. Dr. Li Yang, Visiting Research Scholar, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, China, 1998.

26. Dr. Valentin Tertykh, Visting Research Scholar, Ukraine Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine, 1998.

27. Dr. Viktor Yanishpolskii, Visiting Research Scholar, Ukraine Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine, 1998.

28. Ed Pullen, High School Teacher, Salinas California, 1999.

29. Earl Roske, High School Teacher, Cupertino, California, 1999.

30. Sonia Sentellas, Visiting Research Student, University of Barcelona, Spain, 2001.

31. Francois Guidin, Visiting Research Student, University of Aix-Marseilles, France, 2001.

32. Alan Wilsdorf, Visiting Research Student, University of Aix-Marseilles, France, 2001.

33. Dr. Brent Dawson, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Fellow, 2001-2003.

34. Michelle Vigelletta, Visiting Research Student, Duke University, 2001. 

35. Dr. Miland Padki, Visiting Scientist, 2001-2002

36. Dr. Michel Goedert, Visiting Scientist, 2002- 

37. Audrey Bourdillat, Visiting Research Student. University of Aix-Marseilles, France, 2002. 

38. Ann Barthalan, Visiting Research Student, University of Aix-Marseilles, France, 2002. 

39. Jeome Lafon, Visiting Research Student, University of Aix-Marseilles, France, 2003.

40. Anne Gaudilliere, Visiting Research Student, University of Aix-Marseilles, France, 2004.

41. Dr. Nicolas Plumere, Visiting Research Scholar, University of Tuebingen, Germany, 2006.